MEDIA FOR JUDITH

INTERVIEWS

Words in Sight Podcast – Shloka Shankar mentions the book and fundraiser in her interview about visual poetry with Ramya Vivek. March 26, 2021


Johanna Drucker, Amanda Earl, and Joakim Norling speak to Clara and Anthony Etherin about the book on the Penteract Press Podcast, March 29, 2021


CKCU FM Friday Special Blend: Amanda Earl speaks to Susan Johnston, June 4, 2021


Full House Literary Magazine: Amanda Earl speaks to JP Seabright, June 13, 2021


The Poetry Show on Radio Boise with Daphne Stanford, June 13, 2021


Babel Tower Parish Radio: Amanda Earl speaks to Chloë Proctor, July 29, 2021



REVIEWS


rob mclennan’s review July 1, 2021


Eric Schmaltz’s review in THE MINUTE REVIEW, Volume 2, Number 1 (No Press, June 2021)


Jonathon Ball’s review in the Winnipeg Free Press, July 31, 2021


Anthology of women's poetry a feast for the senses

By: Jonathan Ball

Posted: 4:00 AM CDT Saturday, Jul. 31, 2021

Edited by Amanda Earl, Judith: Women Making Visual Poetry (Timglaset, 256 pages, $43) offers a feast of wide-ranging work. Including 36 women from 21 countries and more than 160 full-colour images alongside interviews, artistic statements and other contextual information, the anthology features a massive amount of excellent and often unique visual work.


Standouts include Astra Papchristodoulou and her sculptural poems, including puzzle-poems, birthday candles, and books made out of bio-resin and words. Mado Reznik’s impressive excerpts from her 30,000 series mourns the victims of Argentina’s last civic-military dictatorship — one of the visual poems is a book that contains pages full of holes, while another features an installation that includes 30,000 hand-knotted threads.


Kate Siklosi’s work threads together the natural and domestic spaces through literally threading words to leaves. Countless other excellent examples abound in this must-have anthology.


Citations and references


Susie Campbell, Visible Stitches: Towards an Aesthetics Of Repair. Axon: Creative Explorations Vol 11, No 2, December 2021. The Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.